Archive for July, 2008

How to Secure Your Computer – 14 Maxims

This post is long overdue. Having completed my How to Secure Your Computer series of articles, it’s time to get links to all of them organized on a single page.

The series debuted on January 4, 2007 on my Lockergnome blog, Ask the Geek, Too. I continued to post them there until March, 2008 when other commitments forced me to put that blog on the back burner. (Chris Pirillo and the Lockergnome gang have been gracious enough to keep my content live and I hope to contribute there again in the future.) I have since revised and re-posted all of the maxims on my Security Corner blog, most of them having been given more catchy titles. You will find the entire archive in descending chronological order in the Security Maxim archives – Security Corner.

Below are links to the original postings up to and including Maxim #11 which was the last one posted to Lockergnome; nos. 12, 13, & 14 are new and appear only at Security Corner.

2007.01.04 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #1
2007.02.22 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #2 (or, How Not to Invite Attackers Into Your PCs and Networks)
2007.03.03 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #3
2007.03.14 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #4
2007.05.30 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #5
2007.06.27 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #6
2007.07.25 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #7
2007.07.26 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #8
2007.07.28 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #9
2007.08.17 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #10
2007.10.29 – How to Secure Your Computer: Maxim #11

I will soon make available a complete compilation of these articles for download as a free bonus to everyone who subscribes to my feed.

Cheers!
The Geek

0

Nixie Tubes Are Beautiful

IN14_Milled_Front1_Small

Thanks to the latest issue of Popular Mechanics, we Geeks who remember these things can get our hands on some beautiful, handmade digital clocks (kit versions are also available). Nixie tubes have a warm glow that produces an aesthetic that today’s digital displays don’t even approach. Check out Peter Jensen’s site, tubeclock.com and browse around. You’ll learn that,

The 1950s saw the advent of the Modern design aesthetic; clean lines, utilitarian forms, and the motto: "Less is More" (Mies van der Rohe). The Nixie tube made its debut in 1954, and provided some of the first digital displays for the latest scientific equipment of the time.  Once utilized primarily in research and military equipment, Nixies are now prized for their modern aesthetic.

Nixies went out of production in the early 1990’s, but there is some new, old-stock surplus available. Do a Google search on "nixie tubes" and you’ll see. By the way, if you want to own the clock shown above, it’ll set you back $495. Look at it as the work of art that it is.

Cheers!

The Geek

0
© 2017 Ask the Geek. All rights reserved.